Juan Forero, Ph.D. (Post-Doctoral Fellow)

Juan Forero graduated with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering from the Universidad de Los Andes (Bogotá, Colombia) in 1999.  He moved to Florida where he completed his Masters degree in Mechanical Engineering, focused in Biomechanics, at Florida International University (Miami, Florida) in 2001.  After completing his Masters, he moved back to Colombia where he worked at CIREC (Centro Integral de Rehabilitación de Colombia) in research focused at improving walking in patients with lower limb amputation.  From his work in CIREC, he learned that gait rehabilitation should not be solely focused at improving prosthetic and orthotic devices for the heterogeneous population of patients who had suffered injuries affecting their walking capabilities, but instead it should be a combination of design and understanding on how the injury has modified the body that controls movement.  With this in mind, he moved to Edmonton in 2007 to start his doctoral studies focused at understanding walking and balance, and completed his PhD in Rehabilitation Medicine at the University of Alberta in 2013.  He worked as a research assistant in Dr. Fouad’s lab until 2015, time during which he expanded his knowledge in research in rehabilitation after spinal cord injury using animal models.  In 2016 he joined the BLINC Lab as a Post-doctoral Fellow working with Dr. Hebert and Dr. Vette developing an assessment tool for balance and performance using the CAREN system at the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital.

Contact me: forero@ualberta.ca

Publications

Misiaszek, J. E., Forero, J., Hiob, E., & Urbanczyk, T. (2016). Automatic postural responses following rapid displacement of a light touch contact during standing. Neuroscience, 316, 1–12. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroscience.2015.12.033

Fenrich, K. K., May, Z., Torres-Espín, A., Forero, J., Bennett, D. J., & Fouad, K. (2015). Single pellet grasping following cervical spinal cord injury in adult rat using an automated full-time training robot. Behavioural Brain Research, 299, 59–71. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2015.11.020

Forero, J., & Misiaszek, J. E. (2015). The amplitude of interlimb cutaneous reflexes in the leg is influenced by fingertip touch and vision during treadmill locomotion. Experimental Brain Research, 233(6), 1–10. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-015-4250-8

Fouad, K., Forero, J., & Hurd, C. (2015). A simple analogy for nervous system plasticity after injury. Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews, 43(2), 100–106. http://doi.org/10.1249/JES.0000000000000040

Forero, J., & Misiaszek, J. E. (2014). The effect of light touch on the amplitude of cutaneous reflexes in the arms during treadmill walking. Experimental Brain Research, 232(9), 2967–2976. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-014-3979-9

Forero, J., & Misiaszek, J. E. (2014). Balance-corrective responses to unexpected perturbations at the arms during treadmill walking. Journal of Neurophysiology, 112(7), 1790–1800. http://doi.org/10.1152/jn.00719.2013

Forero, J. (2013, August 15). Touch and Balance During Walking. (J. E. Misiaszek, Ed.). ERA, Edmonton.

Forero, J., & Misiaszek, J. E. (2013). The contribution of light touch sensory cues to corrective reactions during treadmill locomotion. Experimental Brain Research, 226(4), 575–584. http://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-013-3470-z